Category Archives: Corelle

Corelle brand bowls now sold at Target

The Corelle line of tempered glass dishware and glassware was introduced by Corning in 1970.  The Corelle brand (along with Corning Ware and Pyrex) is now owned by World Kitchen.

The earlier versions of the Corelle product line can be be purchased at many Etsy vintage stores.

As of today, there are 3,423 Corelle related items for sale on Etsy.

Corelle Listings

I spotted these Corelle bowl sets at the main aisles of our local Target store recently…

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Seeing Corelle at Target made me curious if World Kitchen will also reintroduce the popular (past) designs in the Corelle line — as they did for the popular Corning Ware Blue Cornflower line.

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The Spring Blossom design — also fondly known as Crazy Daisy — was among Corelle’s most popular product line.

The bowls sold at the Target store were plain white, and the World Kitchen website — as of today — offered what looked to be completely new, modern patterns.  However, a search tag of “Corelle” on the Target.com website listed 96 items — in white and in a number of new patterns.

The newer Corelle patterns are pretty.

It seems with the ease in getting new Corelle pieces, whether at Target or other retailers, or through the Target and World Kitchen websites, it is inevitable that pricing (and desirability) of Corelle vintage objects will be affected.

New designs are great for new generation Corelle fans, but perhaps not so good for sellers of vintage Corelle items.

Just something to be mindful of if you like and sell Corelle in your Vintage Shop, in case you find your Corelle inventory sitting in the shop  longer than you anticipated.

If you use Corelle products, do you own new  or vintage patterns?

And if you have an Etsy store, have you seen a change related to selling your vintage Corelle pieces?


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Note:  If you want to know the  difference between Corelle, Corning and Pyrex,  read this article posted when I opened up my Etsy Vintage Shop.   

The difference between Corning Ware, Corelle and Pyrex

Are you as perplexed as I am about the difference between Pyrex, Corelle and Corning Ware (now called Corningware)?

I first became familiar with the Corelle brand through my mother, who really liked the dinnerware products because they were light, and for its chip-resistance, and durability.

Over the years, I’ve also purchased Corning Ware casserole dishes in the French White line,  and like many, own several Pyrex products (who doesn’t have a classic Pyrex brand measuring cup, right?)

Now that I am selling some of my pieces on my Etsy Vintage Shop, I am finding that these brands seem to blend into one another.

It was easy enough to post my large Corelle bowls and saucers in the Spring Blossom Green pattern (introduced in 1970), as it was a popular one, and still collectible.

P1210963I found a wonderful website run by a a dedicated collector, called Corelle Corner, which is full of terrific information.

I highly recommend this informative site as a starting point to identify your pieces.  It is an amazing repository of all things Corelle, from an avid fan.

I’ve bookmarked the site and know that I’ll be going back to read more (you can click here to visit site).

But listing my white, vintage Corning Ware casserole dishes is another story…

P1230563It turns out that my old Corning Ware (two words) is now called CorningWare® (one word) and owned by the World Kitchen company.

World Kitchen also owns the Pyrex brand (which turned 100 years old this year!)  and the Corelle brand.

So for the basics, I’m posting a bit of history about these product lines for my 3rd blog post.

THE CORNING GLASS COMPANY – The Parent Company

The original company that created the Pyrex, Corning Ware and the Corelle brands started out in 1851 as Corning Glass Works in Massachusetts and later moved to New York.

Corning History Photo
Photo of Corning Glass’ optic headlamp via Wikipedia Commons

They  specialized in glass, ceramics and related materials for industrial and scientific uses.

Corning developed one of the first optic headlamps (photo above), the glass for the Palomar Observatory’s telescope, and worked on creating new automobile glass windshields in the 1960s.

An excerpt from a Wikipedia article on Corning (now called Corning, Inc.):

The company was known as Corning Glass Works until 1989, when it changed its name to Corning Incorporated.

In 1998, Corning divested itself of its consumer lines of CorningWare and Corelle tableware and Pyrex cookware selling them to World Kitchen, but still holds an interest of about 8%.

You can read the full article, here.

Pyrex

The Pyrex brand and line of specialty glass for laboratory and kitchen use was introduced by Corning in 1915.

Here is interesting information about the history of Pyrex from the World Kitchen website:

Pyrex History

Corning Ware / CorningWare®

Corning introduced the CorningWare brand in 1958, as cooking ware resistant to heat and shock.

Interestingly, it was a material discovered by accident by a researcher working in Corning’s R&D division.

Excerpt from a Wikipedia article:

In 1953 S. Donald Stookey of the Corning Research and Development Division discovered Pyroceram, a white glass-ceramic material capable of withstanding a thermal shock (sudden temperature change) of up to 450 °C (840 °F), by accident.

He was working with photosensitive glass and placed a piece into a furnace planning on heating it to 600 degrees Fahrenheit.

When he checked on his sample the furnace was at 900 degrees and the glass had turned milky white. He reached into the furnace with tongs to discard the sample and it slipped and hit the floor without shattering.

The material was used in the ballistic missile program as a heat-resistant material for nose cones. (More here)

Corelle

The Corelle brand of tempered glass dishware and glassware was introduced by Corning in 1970.  Made from a material called “Vitrelle”, it consisted of glass laminated into 3 layers.

Again, from the World Kitchen website:

Corelle History


I certainly learned a lot more about the differences between the terms CorningWare, Pyrex and Corelle through writing this blog post.

What can add to the confusion between the product lines is that many of the patterns used for the Corelle brand was also used for the CorningWare brand.

But at least I now know the difference!

Was this blog post helpful to you?  I’d love to know, and would appreciate your input in the comment section.

— Jane

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